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Where to find the best spots with street art in London

Street art in London is some of the best in the world.

Visitors travel miles to see it, and street artists from around the world paint its walls. In London, you seem to see street art almost everywhere. Your eyes are drawn to it. London's street art scene is as varied as its many types of street art scattered throughout the city, from the walls of department stores to the underside of bridges to the shutters of a store so it can only be seen at night. London's East End, in particular, is renowned for its vibrant arts and culture scene. In public places, street art, as its name suggests, is one of the most frequently achieved forms of art. In the streets, artists have a platform. Additionally, it can be used to advertise commercially and to maintain good public relations besides just being a medium for art. Communication is facilitated through it.


Street Art Through Graffiti

In general, graffiti is the best-known form of street art. Graffiti's origins were in Italy, more precisely in Rome because it is an Italian word. This art of painting and creating imaginative images on public properties has been around since the 4th century BC. Isn't that amazing? There were times when graffiti was just rudimentary writing and other times when it was a full-fledged picture sprayed on walls. Graffiti groups formed by young artists became known as gang graffiti. Graffiti by Banksy has become a hit in many British homes via various printing methods such as on our Glitter Canvases - Photo Prints, and the artist is one of the most famous graffiti artists in the UK. Then again, there are some forms we do not know a lot about. Sculptures, posters, stencils and murals are included among these forms.


Please read on below to see more!



Shop-Till-you-Drop-by-Banksy
Shop-Till-you-Drop-by-Banksy

Street art and the law in the UK - A Look at Two Sides of the Coin

Additionally, spray paintings possess another element that is not merely aesthetic. Most people consider the street art movement "vandalism," "destruction of property," and even "criminal activity." Others claim that they are a form of social commentary, political protest, and expression. It remains technically illegal in the UK, and considered a criminal activity, which means authorities often try to cover up street art in the city the moment it appears. The reason is that protestors used graffiti to protest against the politics of the day. It has sometimes gone overboard and gained an offensive tone. Additionally, using public property is a crime, as is using another person's property without their permission. As far as graffiti was concerned, it was more of a form of vandalism than an art form. Graffiti can take on a wide variety of meanings depending on who makes it and where it appears. Nevertheless, street art isn't considered vandalism in every case. Street artists get permission to paint on buildings some of the time (but certainly not all of the time), which can result in elaborate, detailed art (especially in East End parts of London). In addition, following the success of Banksy's murals, local councils and property owners began treating them as valuable pieces of art (Their pieces sell for as much as £550,000 at art auctions) and several of them have been preserved for this reason. Art is the motive behind any mural on a public wall, in a subway, or on a train. Graffiti gained negative publicity because of its controversial use sometimes. Ignoring that, many artists gained popularity for their graffiti art. It was requested that they work with advertising companies. On the plus side, this means that by looking around London, you can always find a new piece of street art to explore - but be quick, as they may disappear within a few days or hours. Due to the fact that street artists have to put their work up quickly under a lot of pressure before authorities intervene, much of the street art found around London is covered in dripping paint as the artists simply didn't have the time to allow it to dry after painting.

street art in London, UK

From Graffiti of Yesterday to Graffiti of Today

History has seen many phases of graffiti because it has been in use for so long. At first, it was more of a cultural asset because ancient people used to draw and write on walls to communicate with each other. Recent technological advances have changed graffiti's purpose completely, thanks in part to liquid sprays and spray cans. This shows more of today's youth and the way they live their lives and shows both their pop culture and their attitude. It can also be used for political and personal statements.

Are there any parts of London where street art is particularly famous?

Viewers are free to create their own ideas

Different people perceive this artistic form of self-expression differently. What makes it vandalism or something else that catches the eye consists entirely up to you! In London, Banksy is (arguably) the most famous street artist, and his work can be found in places such as Bruton Lane in Mayfair, the Truman Brewery on Brick Lane, and Rivington Street in Shoreditch. Most of Banksy's work has unfortunately been painted over or even defaced over the years, but you can still find pieces on Portobello Road, beneath London Bridge on Tooley Street, Chiswell Street, and along the Regent's Canal banks in Camden Town. Glitter Canvas Wall Art by Banksy has now become incredibly popular here at Touch Of Glass Prints among young home owners who are looking for contemporary sparkly artworks to decorate their homes. Please check our shop or get in touch if you would like any street artwork to be printed on Glitter Canvas. We will be glad to take a look at your requirements.


Cash-Machine-Girl-by-Banksy
Cash-Machine-Girl-by-Banksy

What was the cause of the street art scene in London?

As street art exploded throughout New York in the 1980s and English hip-hop and electronic music subcultures were gaining popularity, London's streets slowly evolved into canvases when artists began tagging their names on nearly every tube line throughout the city with pseudonyms. The area was not a popular place to live before the 1990s, let alone visit, but that quickly changed as Shoreditch (which is now considered the epicentre of London's street art scene) began to become more and more popular with aspiring street artists. As soon as street artists started leaving their "tags" all around East End and the rest of London as a way to mark their territory and also to "fight back" against the police trying to cover up their work, the East End and the rest of London became a haven for graffiti artists.

street art in London, UK

In London, what kind of street art can you see?

Like all forms of art, London's street art is diverse. Graffiti covering entire walls, stencils layered several times, tag artwork, sculptures attached to buildings, sometimes even flyers and stickers are part of London's street art culture! Other times, London's street art may take the form of monumental installations, such as the "Seven Noses of Soho "that are affixed to a number of buildings all over Soho. Regardless, given that many street artists began their careers as taggers and they still often leave graffiti tags throughout London, even the most simple of tags draw visitors and collectors from all over the world.

street art in London, UK

What are the best streets in London for street art?

It is impossible to miss quality street art in London if you are in Brick Lane or Shoreditch. Camden, Penge, and Dulwich are also excellent spots to see.

street art in London, UK

Are there any parts of London where street art is particularly famous?

The history of creativity in both Brick Lane and Shoreditch dates back decades and has attracted street artists for a long time. Hence, these areas have gained notoriety for their street art. Yet there are plenty of other excellent spots with their own art scenes. For your convenience, we've decided to compile a list of some of the most notable locations to see street art in the city. This may not be everyone's cup of tea. Clearly, some of these will appeal to different people, but one thing is certain, there is a sense of excitement about visiting each one.

Are there any parts of London where street art is particularly famous?

What are the best graffiti spots in London?


Brick Lane

Street art and graffiti can be found in abundance at Brick Lane.

In the heart of the UK's street art scene! It's all about London Street Art on Brick Lane. To the north you will find Bethnal Green and Shoreditch, while the south has Whitechapel. Throughout the years, there have been many communities in the lanes, and the artistic community is just the latest. In addition to visiting the old Seven Stars Car Park, Hanbury Street, The Truman Brewery, Pedley Street, Cheshire Street, Scalter Street and the Nomadic Community Gardens, the area has so many great spots to see.